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Utah Snow Canyon State Park Wheelchair Travel Guide

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Nestled inside the 62,000 acre Red Cliffs Desert Reserve of Utah, Snow Canyon State Park is a 7400 acre scenic park featuring colorful sandstone cliffs, petrified sand dunes, volcanic cinder cones and rugged lava flows. This unique environment at the junction of the Mojave Desert, Great Basin Desert and Colorado Plateau is home to a variety of plants and animals that don’t exist anywhere else in the state – 13 indigenous species are protected by state or federal law, including the peregrine falcon, desert tortoise and gila monster. Humans also have frequented the canyon for hundreds of years; Anasazi...

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Utah: Zion National Park Travel Guide

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Of all the National Parks in Southern Utah, Zion National Park is perhaps the most unique and perhaps one of the most fertile places in the state, which is likely why so many Native American groups inhabited the area. The park itself is quite large, and the area where the roads are paved and tourist gather is just a fraction of the size. You can either drive, walk/roll, or take the free shuttle to the park from the town of Springdale. Whatever you choose, an entrance fee is required at the gate. If you have a national park pass,...

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Lake Powell Accessibility Review & Guide

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Lake Powell is a one hundred and eighty mile-long man-made reservoir for the Colorado River that attracts millions every year. The majority of the lake stretches across Southern Utah but a small portion of the lake is in Northern Arizona and includes Glen Canyon Dam. The dam separates Lake Powell from the Grand Canyon; both maintained by the National Park Service, which means national park entrance fees. From the Glen Canyon Bridge, you can see either side of the dam on the paved pedestrian walkways. Occasionally there is an opening in the car railing and you can cross the...

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Arches National Park: Accessibility Guide

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Arches National Park is one of Utah’s most visited destinations due to the plethora of wind-chiseled arches. Many of the parks iconic arches can be seen right from the road and some have accessible pathways to viewpoints or short trails, though most are unpaved. Trails tend to have multiple surfaces ranging from packed to lose dirt with crushed or larger rocks. Electric wheelchairs or manuals with adapted equipment will have an easier time navigating the terrain of the trails at Arches National Park. Some of the bigger rock formation sites have accessible vaulted (pit) toilets besides one, which is...

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Best Western Hotel by Zion National Park

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Springdale, Utah is the closest town to Zion National Park and houses the visitors traveling to the area along with the employees that bring the town to life. Along the only main road, Highway 9, in Springdale are a number of hotels, eateries and shops all of which can be accessed by an accessible shuttle. This road leads right into Zion National Park and you can take shuttle right to the park or stroll there. There are more than several shuttle stops along Highway 9. One hotel to consider is the Best Western, which has a shuttle stop right...

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Rafting the Colorado River with a Wheelchair

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Kegan Reilly, a 33-year-old rafter and paraplegic, and I lean back-to-back against each other, shivering.  Even with wetsuits, this is a really cold business.   We wait for the next drill to send us back into the 45 degree water.   Kegan looks like he is having more fun than I am. The two of us are among a group of 24 volunteers and the Program Manager for Colorado Discover Ability (CDA) on an annual four-day raft trip down the Colorado River through Cataract Canyon, which runs through Canyonlands National Park.  CDA’s nonprofit mission is to harness outdoor recreation to transform...

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Utah: Bryce Canyon National Park

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Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah offers a series of viewpoints of the canyon, some with short walkways that are accessible. The park provides a printable PDF guide but updates along with additional information are provided below. The only accessible paved trail in Bryce Canyon National Park is a section of the Rim Trail, located between Sunset Point and Sunrise Point. The shuttles are wheelchair friendly with a lift and two spaces on board for two wheelchairs; equipped with safety belts to secure the wheelchairs. The shuttle makes specific stops. You can first catch the shuttle at the Visitor’s...

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Utah: Capitol Reef National Park Accessibility

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Capitol Reef National Park is located in south-central Utah and protects its most famous attraction, the Waterpocket Fold, and the surrounding eroding rocks. The park was given its name because of an area of white Navajo sandstone that somewhat resembles the US Capitol Building, which is visible from the car. Driving around the park is very scenic and it is a good thing as the rest of the park is not very accessible. Off Utah 24 in the park is a boardwalk trail that is less than a quarter of a mile which takes you under trees and along...

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ADA Rooms @ the Abby Inn, Cedar City Utah

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Cedar City is the closest city to stay overnight in if visiting Bryce Canyon National Park (an hour and a half a way). One place to consider staying at is the affordable Abby Inn. It has many of the basic accessible amenities, plus an indoor pool and jacuzzi with a lift but give the staff enough notice for setup. The pool building, main hotel building, and breakfast house all do not have automatic doors. All doors including the room open with a card. There are a total of four handicapped accessible rooms, but only one has a roll-in shower (room #1116)....

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