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Arizona, Antelope Canyon: Access the Inaccessible

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Antelope Canyon is separated into two canyons: Lower Antelope Canyon and Upper Antelope Canyon.  Lower Antelope Canyon is not wheelchair accessible at all as there are stairs that you need to climb down to the slot canyon. I would not consider Upper Antelope Canyon wheelchair accessible neither. In my research, most websites said that it was not.  But when there’s a will, there’s a way!  This is how I did it. Research: Know the Foundation First off, I researched Upper Antelope Canyon by visiting YouTube and searching images online to see what the canyons may look like.  I discovered...

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Copper Queen Hotel in Bisbee, Arizona

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Because most of the buildings in Bisbee, Arizona were built in the early 1900s on hillsides near the mine, finding accessible accommodations can be difficult. Most of the inns and hotels are constructed with a lobby, restaurant/saloon or parlor on the first floor, and the guest rooms upstairs. The one exception I have found is the Copper Queen Hotel, built by the Phelps Dodge Mining Company in 1902. It maintains the quaint charm of a hotel that is more than a century old, with antique furnishings and its own saloon. The 4th floor of the building is rumored to be...

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Access in the Historical Town of Bisbee, Arizona

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The historic town of Bisbee is nestled in Tombstone Canyon in the Mule Mountains in southeastern Arizona. The community was founded in 1880 when the local mining camp became one of the richest mineral sites in the world. This “Queen of the Copper Camps” produced almost three million ounces of gold and over eight billion pounds of copper, as well as silver, lead, and zinc. By the early 1900s, Bisbee’s population had topped 20,000 and it was the largest town between St. Louis and San Francisco. Its notorious Brewery Gulch boasted 47 saloons, but it was also home to...

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Arizona: Monuments in Coconino National Forest

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Sunset Crater and Wupatki Pueblo National Monuments are located near each other in the Coconino National Forest about 30 minutes east of the city of Flagstaff, Arizona (see map). It is possible to visit both of them in an afternoon, and their convenient location makes a nice side-trip if your itinerary includes Grand Canyon National Park, Lake Powell and/or Petrified Forest National Park. The best time to visit is April through October. The elevation varies between 5000 and 7000′ so it gets cold in the winter and does snow. These Monuments are part of a fascinating geological area in...

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Arizona: Chiricahua National Monument

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Chiricahua National Monument in Arizona is a hidden gem! The spectacular mountain scenery includes stunning vistas of the Sulphur Springs Valley stretching hundreds of miles, as well as rocky canyons full of fascinating pinnacles and gravity-defying rock formations. The unique geology of this area that the Apaches named “land of standing up rocks” was formed 27 million years ago when the Turkey Creek Volcano erupted and deposited ash over 1200 square miles. Hot ash particles melted together and formed layers of gray rock called rhyolite. Subsequent cooling and uplifting created joints and cracks, and eons of weathering by ice wedging and...

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Access the Mountain Lakes of Prescott, Arizona

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If you love the Great Outdoors, the historic town of Prescott, Arizona has a lot to offer. It’s nestled against the cool, piney hills of the Prescott National Forest and is home to several sparkling mountain lakes. Sitting at an elevation of 5200 feet, Prescott boasts an average temperature of 70 degrees – making it a perfect getaway from the scorching heat of the Sonoran Desert or the urban heat island of the Phoenix Metro Area. Getting There Can be Half The Fun By Air: Prescott Regional Airport (PRC) offers direct flights to Los Angeles International and Denver International...

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Lake Powell Accessibility Review & Guide

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Lake Powell is a one hundred and eighty mile-long man-made reservoir for the Colorado River that attracts millions every year. The majority of the lake stretches across Southern Utah but a small portion of the lake is in Northern Arizona and includes Glen Canyon Dam. The dam separates Lake Powell from the Grand Canyon; both maintained by the National Park Service, which means national park entrance fees. From the Glen Canyon Bridge, you can see either side of the dam on the paved pedestrian walkways. Occasionally there is an opening in the car railing and you can cross the...

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Accessibility of the Visiting the Hoover Dam

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The creation of Hoover Dam, aimed to control the Colorado River, was a monumental engineering accomplishment that set precedent for future large construction projects. Half of the dam is in the state of Nevada and the other is in Arizona. Two clock towers can be seen on the dam with both states current time displayed. As you approach the parking structure you will see the Mike O’Callaghan—Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge, also known as the Hoover Dam Bypass Bridge. You can drive on it but the walls are so high that it blocks any view. If you do not have...

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Arizona: Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument

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If you want to get “off the beaten path” and “away from the maddening crowd” then Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument may be just the place. Located in south-central Arizona on the Mexican border, this 517 square-mile area of the Sonoran Desert was created by President Franklin Roosevelt in 1937 to preserve and protect a unique ecosystem and the culture and history of the people who have inhabited it. Living things that exist here must be able to tolerate extreme temperatures and intense sun with little rainfall. The most notable resident is the Monument’s namesake; the Organ Pipe Cactus...

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Arizona: Tuzigoot Monument & Dead Horse Ranch State Park

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Arizona’s lush Verde River Valley is home to Tuzigoot National Monument and Dead Horse Ranch State Park. Tuzigoot National Monument is situated on the Verde River just across the water from Dead Horse Ranch State Park, a 423-acre riparian area that offers outdoor recreation like picnicing, hiking, fishing, and camping. Because of their proximity, it is possible to visit both of these sites comfortably in one day. The monument protects an ancient village built by the Sinagua people who lived there between 1000 and 1400 A.D.  The Sinaguan culture was based on agriculture and they had trade connections that...

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Visit the Grand Canyon National Park Barrier-Free

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The Grand Canyon in Arizona is regarded as one of the 7 natural wonders of the world, and rightfully so. Over centuries the mighty Colorado River has stretched this grand dessert landscape across 18 miles rim to rim. The Colorado River is still at work 2,200 feet below the rim cutting into some of the oldest rock on the planet, about 2 billion years-old. This incredible piece of art and history exist today because of John Muir, a man who dedicated his life to preserving the greatest natural landscapes in the US. It was hiking in Yosemite with President...

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Disabled Horse Riding and Ranch in Arizona

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Located in northwest Arizona, just 2 1/2 hours from Las Vegas, Stagecoach Trails Guest Ranch is a wheelchair accessible desert oasis. It sits on 360 acres near three majestic mountain ranges and under clear blue skies. Surrounding the property is approximately 360,000 acres of federal land that is still relatively untouched and looks like the true “Wild West.” The views at the ranch, needless to say, are spectacular. Stagecoach Trails Guest Ranch welcomes up to 40 guests, providing an intimate family setting. It is fully handicapped accessible and can comfortably accommodate both disabled and able-bodied guests. The spacious guest...

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Attractions in Sedona, Arizona with a Wheelchair

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What brings many tourists to Sedona, Arizona as well as the reason why Native Americans have settled here are the majestic Red Rocks that surrounds this area. To the Native Americans the Red Rock is sacred and continues to draw people like a magnet from all over the world year round. Thanks to John Muir and President Roosevelt much of the land remains undeveloped so countless generations can enjoy the natural beauty of the Red Rocks. Maps to the massive Red Rock Landmarks are available almost everywhere and along roads to them are numerous pathways and trailheads. The paths...

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Premier Vacation Club in Sedona, Arizona

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Right off Highway 179 in Sedona, Arizona is the Premier Vacation Club at Red Rock is surrounded by Sedona’s most sacred natural feature. The staff is exceptionally friendly and helpful in getting you where you need to go, equipped with maps and coupons. There are board games and poker chips in the lobby and on Wednesday night a movie is played in the small theater. Room #137 is a wheelchair accessible, ground floor suite with plenty of room to maneuver around and one of the two hotel pools located right off the patio (below left photo) The room even...

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