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Seoul, South Korea by Wheelchair

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My wife and I visited Seoul on the third leg of a 3 stop tour of Asia.  We had some trouble getting there because we flew on a budget airline, and they were not really equipped for wheelchair travelers.  In retrospect, I would not have flown on a budget airline, but with a more established carrier; at one point, I thought they were not going to let us on. The Seoul airport itself is very nice and modern – make sure you get information here if you do not speak Korean, since most Koreans do not speak English.  Pre-planning...

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My Visit to Taipei, Taiwan with a Wheelchair

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My wife and I visited Taipei, Taiwan recently on the first leg of a three stop tour of Asia.  Since I have family there, I was able to stay with them and save some money on accommodations. However, in the past I have stayed at an airbnb in Taipei, which was a bit cramped but manageable.  If you go that route, make sure the host can send you measurements since the definition of accessibility is different in Asia than in the US.  I have also tried to find an accessible hotel in the past, and the language may be...

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Thai Senior and Disabled Travel Company Tour

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Thai Senior and Disabled Travel Co., Ltd., is a tour operator and travel consultant for accessible tourism in Thailand, with professional teams who are experienced and specialized in Senior and Disabled citizen tour operation, tour planning, and various other services. Thai Senior and Disabled Travel is the first tour operator for an Accessible tourism in Thailand. We are aware of the issues that the elderly and disabled who travel to Thailand often have to suffer, so we have provide these services that regular tour operator do not provide. Our mission is to provide our customer the best tourism and hospitality services, especially for...

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Thailand Access with a Manual Wheelchair

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I am a T2 paraplegic and I travelled through Thailand for two weeks in a manual chair with my boyfriend, who is not in a wheelchair. With its amazing cultural and geographical diversity, I discovered that there are limitless ways to experience Thailand. For wheelchair users however, this is not yet the easiest of countries to travel in despite the tourism industry explosion over the last decade. Nonetheless, with some advanced planning an enjoyable and exciting adventure is definitely possible. Good news is that accessibility is greatly improving in tourism hotspots although many parts of the country are still...

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Access in Vietnam: What to Expect & Travel Tips

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I choose to travel to Vietnam on a whim. I wanted to go to Southeast Asia and I had heard Vietnam was cheap. I also have a bad habit of impulse buying plane tickets. I took my mom knowing she was adventurous as well. We traveled for 10 days, mainly staying in the North. Overall, I was amazed how kind and generous people were. I’ll try to provide some insight on travel and getting around Vietnam. [Not a valid template] Visiting Hanoi We started our trip in the crazy city of Hanoi. There were so many people, motorbikes and...

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Krankin’ thru China

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Krankin’ thru China was established in 2013 by two Americans and their Chinese friend in an effort to enhance physical and mental wellness among people with disabilities in China. Initially focusing on handcycling as an avenue for physical wellness and social interaction, Krankin’ thru China is currently planning to expand into other activities including swimming, yoga, dance, scuba diving and destination travel with a fitness center of our own based in Beijing,...

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Travel in Nepal: Accessibility Review

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I have just returned from a familiarization tour of Nepal organized by Four Season Travel and Tours of Kathmandu. There are major infrastructure and human resource training needs still to be met in the country. However I was successful in visiting Kathmandu, Chitwan and Pokhara – respectively the country’s destinations for cultural tourism, jungle tourism, and Himalaya adventures. I did so in relative comfort with the assistance of Pankaj Pradhananga, Logistics Manager of Four Season. On the tour of May 14 – 23 I made public presentations on accommodating travelers with disabilities meeting 200 or more travel industry and...

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Japan: Accessible Travel Guide Overview

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I spent most of my time in Tokyo, which is broken up into over a dozen distinct areas and is densely populated. For five full days and four nights I was also in Kyoto, plus one day spent in Nara. I wanted to go to Osaka but ran out of time. There is still much of Japan that I wish to see. I noticed a few distinct accessibility differences between Japan and the USA. For one, Japan is the originator of using tactile paving (truncated domes) on sidewalks and train stations to help the blind navigate. Often, these truncated domes...

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Saint Petersburg, Russia Accessible Travel

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The city on the Neva River, Saint Petersburg, in Russia bears a lot of names and each name has a geographical, romantic, political, historical or cultural meaning: the Northern Capital, The City of White Nights, The City of Three Revolutions, and The Northern Venice. Locals take pride in their city that is full of historical and cultural values. The city with a rich history is awaiting you. The city was conceived by Peter the Great, Tsar of Russia, to be not only an outpost of Russia in the Northwest Region and the new capital of the Russian Empire but...

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Accessible Timeshares for Rent Worldwide

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Want to get away? More and more resorts are now offering many wheelchair accessible accommodations to choose from, but selecting which resort to book can prove to be an overwhelming task when done on your own. SellMyTimeshareNow.com offers an online marketplace of wheelchair accessible timeshare rentals and resales available by owner in destinations worldwide. Because these units are available by owner, they are priced roughly 60% less than the direct resort costs. Timeshare specialists are available by phone to assist in helping you find the perfect accessible unit for your stay. Since ADA modifications vary property to property, working...

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Ladakh, India: Take an Accessible Tour

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Barren majestic mountains reach out to the sky entwined with prayer flags fluttering in distant monasteries; blue skies, grey snaking roads, brown rivers and silver snow-clad peaks in the distance; pink butter tea, colorful robes, music and friendly smiles. Welcome to Ladakh! The magic of the Himalayas lifts your spirit and weaves it with the mystery of timeless traditions and natural wonders. The mountainous deserts, situated at altitudes ranging from 9,000ft to 25,000ft, have the Karakoram ranges as their northern sentinel and the Himalayas on the south. Together with the mountain kings, the Zanskar and the Indus rivers have painstakingly...

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Tour China with a Wheelchair: Travel Barriers & Possibilities

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An image of a wheelchair engraved on a stone dated as early as 5000 years ago was found in China yet the treatment of the disabled in China is unsatisfactory to say the least.  Being Chinese and disabled is hard and in many cases life-ending. Government and public employees that are injured in an accident are supported by the state and accident victims may be compensated at best by the owners of the offender according to his or her abilities. If lucky some receive support from family members but when there is none, the severely disabled will either struggle by themselves or end...

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A Vacation in China: Tips on Accessibility

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I would like to share some of my wheelchair experiences while on vacation in China with my wife.  First, let me tell you that I am not a writer by any means.  I just wanted to capture some of the issues we had to work out while traveling abroad.  I will preface this by saying the trip was fantastic and very exciting.  I am glad I went and can’t wait to try another country or countries. My wife planned the entire China vacation.  She had learned about the particular tour company called China Odyssey Tours.com from a co-worker that...

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Thailand Holiday Travel Guide: Wheelchair Tips

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I’m 46 year old Danish man with spinal cord injury who lives in Thailand about six months per year. I was in Thailand for the first time for one month in January 2009. I feel so comfortable in the tropic weather that I decide to stay as much as possible in Thailand. Because of my spinal cord damage, I have a lot of pain to deal with. I have neuropathic pain disturbance which cause pain in the face and arms, although these parts of the body isn’t paralyzed. Therefore, I take a lot of medicine if I am in...

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Visit Accessible Attractions in Japan

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When traveling to a different country most people will plan each day where multiple attractions can be seen, which is easy in Japan because most of the time a few attractions are clustered together. Attractions can be just a station or two away or within rolling distance from each other. With so much to see along the way, time management becomes vital. Regardless, it’s good planning to pick up a map of the area you are visiting at the train station you get off at to help you navigate and use when asking for directions. On the sidewalks near train...

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Wheelchair Accessible Transportation in Japan

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Train travel is the most popular way to get around Japan and for a tourist using a wheelchair it is vital. Train stations are resources for information, food, water, public restrooms, navigation and even shopping for pretty much anything. Every station has maps displayed to what lines are available and what area is covered as well as information booths that have maps you can take in English or whatever language you prefer showing the train routes and tourist attractions in the area. There is usually at least one person working that knows a little English if you have more...

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Japan Journey: What an Adventure!

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It was hot and humid. Beads of sweat were rapidly racing down my back and face. The sound of semi (cicada) bugs filled the air like tiny violins playing the same note. It was around four o’clock and I had been wheeling around all day. Where were these Ukai Cormorant Fishermen that I was looking for? My body urged me to take cover from the sun’s intense summer rays. I decided to take refuge at a small food stand stationed on the banks of the Oi River in the Arashiyama District of Kyoto. An unhinged plank of wood lay...

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Accessibility at Mitsui Garden Hotel in Kyoto, Japan

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Mitsui Garden Hotel Kyoto Shijo is a mid-ranged price hotel on a small side street. The Kyoto subway is not located far from this hotel as well as a number of attractions, including the popular Nishiki Market. The automatic doors open up to the lobby’s smooth marble floor. The décor was modern and simple. The check-in desk did not have a lowered section but wasn’t the full height of a standing counter so it was manageable. The lobby floor also has a small café where you can get a continental breakfast. On the second floor is the Otowa restaurant which...

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Hearton Hotel in Kyoto, Japan

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Hearton Hotel is a mid-priced hotel in Kyoto is on a small side street in a very central location, surrounded by many attractions and the train station within rolling distance. Right outside of the entrance is a handicapped parking spot and once thru the automatic doors the check-in counter is on the left. The Hearton Hotel had no lowered check-in space for wheelchair users. Only one or two employees at the hotel could speak English but this was very limited at best. To the right of the check-in counter is a café that offers western-style entrées for breakfast and...

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Tyoko Inn in Kawasaki, Japan

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Tyoko Inn is a budget business hotel located all over Japan and in some cities multiple can be found.  I would definitely stay at a Tyoko Inn again. In Kawasaki, the Tyoko Inn was a little over a block away from the train station in a popular area for shopping and dining. Kawasaki is just over a bridge from Tokyo. Only one entrance into the hotel exists and has automatic doors that on occasion need to be opened with a push of a button. A handicapped parking spot is just outside this door. The check-in counter had a lowered...

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