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Ontario, Canada Accessible Beach Resort

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Oasis by the Bay Vacation Resort is open year-round and is located in Wasaga Beach, Ontario is a subsidiary of E3 Community Services. This exciting four-season vacation concept was developed with special needs in mind and has much to offer in terms of its accommodation, location, vacation and excursion and more. The motel is nestled in between the beach and river and offers one and two bedroom apartment style units. Five ground floor units are accessible and boast one bedroom with two single beds with a lift system, accessible washroom with lift system with either a shower/tub combination (3 units)...

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Toronto, Canada Accessible Travel Overview

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Toronto is a cosmopolitan centre offering culture, shopping, sports, and much to see and do. It’s Canada’s largest city, the Province of Ontario’s capital, and the fourth-largest city in North America – and apparently, a place the country can take pleasure in hating. Well, you can’t have everything! As a native of Toronto, I wish I could extol the accessibility of our bustling city. However, one of the world’s most multicultural cities has not done the best to embrace people with disabilities by providing first-rate access. (I am jealous of the ADA in the USA!) Our politicians talk more...

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Toronto, Canada Accessible Attractions: See and Do

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While getting around may prove challenging, thankfully most of the attractions in Toronto offer some degree of access. I couldn’t possibly tell you about everything there is to do in the city. Just thinking about what there is to do in Toronto makes me think I have too much to do beyond writing this! Here’s some of what you can see from a wheelchair in TO. The iconic CN Tower provides spectacular views of the GTA. Consider springing for a pricey lunch or dinner at the revolving restaurant. Admission to the viewing decks is already expensive but if you...

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Toronto, Canada: Accessible Public & Private Transportation

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Getting around Toronto is probably the biggest challenge facing many travellers who use a wheelchair. Driving in or renting a vehicle will provide the most options although you will have to deal with our notorious gridlock. I have read (but haven’t verified) that all major car rental companies in Canada’s larger cities provide vehicles with hand controls, and that Thrifty also has accessible vans. “Green P” parking lots can be located online. You will also find some street parking, as well as malls and some stores with their own lots/spots. If arriving at Pearson International Airport, the easiest and most common...

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Toronto, Canada: Accessible Hotels with Access

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If you’re in Toronto to see the main sights, you will probably want to stay at a downtown hotel, especially if you don’t have a vehicle. If you are planning on wheeling or TTC’g it, look for a hotel between roughly Front (in the south) and Bloor Streets (in the north), from the Yonge Street area (from the east) over to about University Avenue/Avenue Road (in the west). Reportedly a number of hotels have at least one or two accessible rooms, some with roll-in showers. All of the hotels listed below should have shopping and dining options in the...

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Toronto, Canada: Accessible Dining Restaurants

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Bon Appetite! Toronto is the “land of plenty” when it comes to dining out. Half of Toronto’s population was born outside of Canada so plan on enjoying some good food during your stay. You can eat your way around the world in Toronto. However, our abundant restaurants are often not accessible. Your choices will be greater if you are not looking for an establishment with a wheelchair accessible washroom. Finding an accurate source of information on accessible restaurants is a problem. I’ve tried some sites providing “wheelchair accessible” as a searchable variable (e.g. Yelp, Toronto Life, dine.to) and found restaurants...

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Toronto, Canada: Wheeling Streets & Sidewalks

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The summer is the top tourist season but our weather makes travelling in three of four seasons viable for the wheelchair user. (I personally would pass on winter unless it’s a work trip! Go south I say.) If you stay downtown you may find that wheeling is the best way to get around for much of your stay. Toronto is not particularly hilly, but it’s not flat. Curb cuts are the norm. Quality can be another matter although generally cuts downtown aren’t too bad compared to some cities I have visited. We do have our share of potholes due to...

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Toronto, Canada: Accessible Shopping Areas

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Toronto is a shopping destination. The first store on my list would be the highly unusual, IZ Adaptive, owned by Canadian fashion designer, Izzy Camilleri. Izzy has dressed actors including Meryl Streep, Angelina Jolie, and Mark Walberg but now her passion is designing fashionable, yet functional clothes for people who use wheelchairs. Whether you are “the fashionable traveler”, or you just want to get into your pants without too much effort, check out Izzy’s website. A few of the great buys include: jeans and other pants that fit to a seated figure and include hidden side zippers and/or elastic...

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Toronto, Canada: Accessible Sports & Entertainment Venues

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Toronto attracts top talent from around the country and the world. Sit back and enjoy a game, show, or concert or two while you are here. All major live entertainment venues provide wheelchair access, including washrooms and possibly some parking (check each website). Seating is usually limited; frequently there is no choice of price range. You can check shows online but typically you have to speak to a live operator to buy wheelchair accessible tickets. If you want to use an accessible restroom before a show plan on some extra time due to long lines. Toronto’s largest venues, the...

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Toronto, Canada Accessible Sightseeing-Tours

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Tours offer slim picking for the wheelchair traveller. Walking tours may provide another option. Walkto.ca advertises that two of its tours, Nutshell and Toronto the Green, are “fully wheelchair accessible.” In addition, this City Sightseeing Tour Company has at least one accessible bus so making arrangements ahead of time is necessary. Heritage Toronto Walks feature historic themed join-in walks around Toronto. Some can be completed in a wheelchair. While not specifically advertised as accessible, there are some other walking tour options to consider. The award winning ROMwalks offer over 40 walks through Toronto neighbourhoods of special architectural and historic interest. In addition, Toronto...

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Interesting Weekend in Toronto

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Just returned from an “interesting” long weekend in Toronto.  We had reservations for a wheelchair accessible room at the Hilton in the Theater district, which I made in May.  When we tried to check in, guess what?  No wheelchair accessible room available, despite the fact that I showed them my e-mailed confirmation for that type of room.  I was told there were only two wheelchair accessible rooms (in a 600 room hotel!!!) and someone in “central reservations” obviously screwed up. But things improved from there.  The Hilton arranged rooms for us (my wife and two friends) at the Sheraton across...

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