ABOUT

Harrison Hot Springs, British Columbia, Canada

By

I spent three nights at the Harrison Hot Springs Resort in British Columbia, Canada while my wife attended business meetings there. From an accessibility standpoint, I would give this facility a grade of C+. It was obvious that the hotel has made some improvements in terms of accessibility since I was last there about ten years ago, but it still has a long way to go. Hotel Access On entering the hotel you are met with a flight of stairs between the front desk and the elevators. Wheelchair access to the elevators is through another door at the far end...

Read More

Montreal, Canada Accessible Travel Guide

By

The city of Montreal in the Quebec Province is one of the most visited destinations in Canada with lots of friendly people. French is the most commonly spoken language here but nearly everyone also speaks English. Like many big cities, it is divided up into neighborhoods but the most popular area is the downtown, particularly Old Montreal. Old Montreal is the most historic part of the city with buildings designed during the French and British colonization. Statues idolizing this era are scatter throughout this area. If you are interested in architecture or history, then just wondering around would supply...

Read More

Ontario, Canada Accessible Beach Resort

By

Oasis by the Bay Vacation Resort is open year-round and is located in Wasaga Beach, Ontario is a subsidiary of E3 Community Services. This exciting four-season vacation concept was developed with special needs in mind and has much to offer in terms of its accommodation, location, vacation and excursion and more. The motel is nestled in between the beach and river and offers one and two bedroom apartment style units. Five ground floor units are accessible and boast one bedroom with two single beds with a lift system, accessible washroom with lift system with either a shower/tub combination (3 units)...

Read More

Montreal Transportation in Quebec, Canada

By

Overall, accessibility is an afterthought in Montreal. It is possible to navigate around Montreal but whether it be navigating the sidewalks and streets or using transportation challenges exists. For starters, the city has a number of hills that surround Mount Royal. Not every attraction that you may want to see is located in the downtown or Old Montreal area, so even for power wheelchairs and scooters, transportation is likely needed at some point. Sidewalks were overall maintained well and curb-cuts or walkway ramps were plentiful. However, sometimes transitions from the street to sidewalk was far from streamlined; effecting the...

Read More

Toronto, Canada Accessible Travel Overview

By

Toronto is a cosmopolitan centre offering culture, shopping, sports, and much to see and do. It’s Canada’s largest city, the Province of Ontario’s capital, and the fourth-largest city in North America – and apparently, a place the country can take pleasure in hating. Well, you can’t have everything! As a native of Toronto, I wish I could extol the accessibility of our bustling city. However, one of the world’s most multicultural cities has not done the best to embrace people with disabilities by providing first-rate access. (I am jealous of the ADA in the USA!) Our politicians talk more...

Read More

Vancouver, Canada Accessible Attractions

By

I love Vancouver. The sustainable design of the city filled with friendly, diverse people makes it a model city of the future. From a postman to a Muslim businessman, I had the pleasure of really talking with a several locals, all warm, welcoming and just a joy to be around. What is it about this city that makes people so happy here? Perhaps, it is the clean air. Vancouver integrates plants with urban life. All around the city you see people with plants on their porches, roof-top gardens that will include large trees or even grass all over the...

Read More

Sea Adventure in Glacier Bay, B.C.

By

It’s always a bit risky taking a journey to a remote destination where accessibility may be in question.   But seven years after his accident, Steve Pisano, a T3-4 paraplegic, packed up his cameras and ventured to Alaska for an experience of a lifetime aboard the Sea Wolf Adventures cruise ship. It was through Craig Hospital, where Steve did his rehab, that he learned about Sea Wolf Adventures (SWA).  Two recreational therapists at Craig, Laurie Womeldorff and Stephanie Deml, coordinated the trip plans for group cruises aboard SWA for their alumni patients.  They both had been on a few...

Read More

Toronto, Canada Accessible Attractions: See and Do

By

While getting around may prove challenging, thankfully most of the attractions in Toronto offer some degree of access. I couldn’t possibly tell you about everything there is to do in the city. Just thinking about what there is to do in Toronto makes me think I have too much to do beyond writing this! Here’s some of what you can see from a wheelchair in TO. The iconic CN Tower provides spectacular views of the GTA. Consider springing for a pricey lunch or dinner at the revolving restaurant. Admission to the viewing decks is already expensive but if you...

Read More

Toronto, Canada: Accessible Public & Private Transportation

By

Getting around Toronto is probably the biggest challenge facing many travellers who use a wheelchair. Driving in or renting a vehicle will provide the most options although you will have to deal with our notorious gridlock. I have read (but haven’t verified) that all major car rental companies in Canada’s larger cities provide vehicles with hand controls, and that Thrifty also has accessible vans. “Green P” parking lots can be located online. You will also find some street parking, as well as malls and some stores with their own lots/spots. If arriving at Pearson International Airport, the easiest and most common...

Read More

Toronto, Canada: Accessible Hotels with Access

By

If you’re in Toronto to see the main sights, you will probably want to stay at a downtown hotel, especially if you don’t have a vehicle. If you are planning on wheeling or TTC’g it, look for a hotel between roughly Front (in the south) and Bloor Streets (in the north), from the Yonge Street area (from the east) over to about University Avenue/Avenue Road (in the west). Reportedly a number of hotels have at least one or two accessible rooms, some with roll-in showers. All of the hotels listed below should have shopping and dining options in the...

Read More

Toronto, Canada: Accessible Dining Restaurants

By

Bon Appetite! Toronto is the “land of plenty” when it comes to dining out. Half of Toronto’s population was born outside of Canada so plan on enjoying some good food during your stay. You can eat your way around the world in Toronto. However, our abundant restaurants are often not accessible. Your choices will be greater if you are not looking for an establishment with a wheelchair accessible washroom. Finding an accurate source of information on accessible restaurants is a problem. I’ve tried some sites providing “wheelchair accessible” as a searchable variable (e.g. Yelp, Toronto Life, dine.to) and found restaurants...

Read More

Toronto, Canada: Wheeling Streets & Sidewalks

By

The summer is the top tourist season but our weather makes travelling in three of four seasons viable for the wheelchair user. (I personally would pass on winter unless it’s a work trip! Go south I say.) If you stay downtown you may find that wheeling is the best way to get around for much of your stay. Toronto is not particularly hilly, but it’s not flat. Curb cuts are the norm. Quality can be another matter although generally cuts downtown aren’t too bad compared to some cities I have visited. We do have our share of potholes due to...

Read More

Toronto, Canada: Accessible Shopping Areas

By

Toronto is a shopping destination. The first store on my list would be the highly unusual, IZ Adaptive, owned by Canadian fashion designer, Izzy Camilleri. Izzy has dressed actors including Meryl Streep, Angelina Jolie, and Mark Walberg but now her passion is designing fashionable, yet functional clothes for people who use wheelchairs. Whether you are “the fashionable traveler”, or you just want to get into your pants without too much effort, check out Izzy’s website. A few of the great buys include: jeans and other pants that fit to a seated figure and include hidden side zippers and/or elastic...

Read More

Toronto, Canada: Accessible Sports & Entertainment Venues

By

Toronto attracts top talent from around the country and the world. Sit back and enjoy a game, show, or concert or two while you are here. All major live entertainment venues provide wheelchair access, including washrooms and possibly some parking (check each website). Seating is usually limited; frequently there is no choice of price range. You can check shows online but typically you have to speak to a live operator to buy wheelchair accessible tickets. If you want to use an accessible restroom before a show plan on some extra time due to long lines. Toronto’s largest venues, the...

Read More

Toronto, Canada Accessible Sightseeing-Tours

By

Tours offer slim picking for the wheelchair traveller. Walking tours may provide another option. Walkto.ca advertises that two of its tours, Nutshell and Toronto the Green, are “fully wheelchair accessible.” In addition, this City Sightseeing Tour Company has at least one accessible bus so making arrangements ahead of time is necessary. Heritage Toronto Walks feature historic themed join-in walks around Toronto. Some can be completed in a wheelchair. While not specifically advertised as accessible, there are some other walking tour options to consider. The award winning ROMwalks offer over 40 walks through Toronto neighbourhoods of special architectural and historic interest. In addition, Toronto...

Read More

Tour Bus Whistler, British Columbia is Accessible

By

At 8am the West Coast Sightseeing Tour Bus arrived at the hotel. The back of the bus had a lift to transport people in wheelchairs inside. Only one wheelchair per tour is able to participate because there is only one set of locking mechanisms. Once the driver secured my wheelchair in place, we were off to pick up the remaining guests of the tour. On the way to Whistler, the tour driver narrated along the carefully selected course starting with Stanley Park. It was a quick drive through the park to reach the Lion’s Gate Bridge, named after the...

Read More

The SeaBus in Vancouver, B.C.

By

The SeaBus in Vancouver connects passengers from the Downtown Waterfront Station to the Lonsdale Quay Station in North Vancouver. The SeaBus runs every 15 minutes during the day and every 30 minutes in the evening. Crossing from one side to the other takes less than 15 minutes. Some days it runs past midnight. The SeaBus is accessible to wheelchair users. Both terminals have slopes down to the water to reach the boats, though the one at Lonsdale Quay is slightly less steep. In both stations tickets are purchased at the kiosk but there is usually an attendant nearby if you need assistance....

Read More

Bus System in Victoria, B.C.

By

Victoria, British Columbia – The Victoria Regional Transit System, or the bus, is an easy and convenient way to get around Victoria for a wheelchair traveler. All buses are wheelchair accessible and at each bus stop you’ll see the universal symbol. If your bus is approaching then try to make eye contact with driver and move towards the bus. The bus will lower and a ramp will flip out so be sure you are not in the way. Once inside there will be a space indicating it to be priority for the disabled seating.  Most of the time there is...

Read More

River Rock Casino Resort in B.C.

By

(Review provided by Maureen Fisher) My sister-in-law and I just returned from a wonderful six-day trip to Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, where we stayed at the River Rock Casino Resort in Richmond for the second time. The River Rock is located a short 7 minute ride from the airport on the Canada Line and is connected to the train via a covered sky bridge to the Bridgeport Station. The Canada Line easily accommodates a power wheelchair. The ticket price from the airport is expensive, $7.50 each, however to travel from the hotel to downtown Vancouver or back to the airport is...

Read More

Accessible Restaurants in Vancouver, British Columbia

By

Al Porto Ristorante (Italian) – This restaurant is wheelchair accessible via the elevator through the Water Street entrance; wheelchair accessible bathrooms inside. Located in the Gastown District. Cardero’s (Seafood) – Take the Seawall at Harbour Green Park to reach restaurant right overlooking Coral Harbour. There is a nice large outdoor patio and inside seating as well. Chambar (Pacific Northwest) – Fully wheelchair accessible including the washrooms. When making reservations, it is best to specify wheelchair accessibility as some tables have easier access than others. Only open for dinner. Cork & Fine Restaurant (Pacific Northwest) – Located on the ground...

Read More
Page 1 of 212

Pin It on Pinterest